What Wood You Use?

Posted by Devin on 1/18/2014 to Military Displays
For those who have loved ones or friends in the military, few things show your appreciation, admiration and respect for them like a sword, knife or gun display, or a shadow box. Additionally, if you have an antique firearm or sword that you'd love to show off, a wood display is very aesthetically pleasing. Once you've decided to go with a beautiful, custom wooden display for any of the aforementioned occasions, the question arises: which wood do you choose?
 
To some, it may not seem like a big deal. Wood’s wood, right? This is just not the case. Each wood has a different color and warmth, and invokes a certain mood.

Walnut

 Firstly, walnut is considered a hardwood, akin to perhaps oak, maple or mahogany. It’s also very dense, with a tight grain pattern, which leaves a very smooth finish upon polishing. Depending on whether the wood is sapwood or heartwood, the color will be more creamy white, or take on a dark chocolate color, respectively.
 
Walnut is an exceptional choice if the display is to be in a place more subject to temperature change or the elements, as walnut is quite resistant to decay and is very durable. It looks fantastic encasing a display piece.

Cherry

Cherry wood is from the cherry tree, naturally. It has a very distinctive reddish brown color that radiates a one-of-a-kind beauty. Interestingly, when cherry wood is cut, it is initially quite pale in color. As it ages, it becomes darker and richer. Cherry is a very strong wood, but a bit softer than other hardwoods. It’s very fine textured, with an equally distinctive grain pattern running down it, and very capable of accepting a stain or glaze. This means the finished product will display a more even finish. The unique luster of cherry wood is what usually attracts most people to select it.
 
Both woods are absolutely beautiful and make exquisite material for displays, and will serve to enhance the display piece.

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 What Wood You Use?
 With a Little Maintenance, Your Sword Display Will Look Great Year After Year
 How to Determine the Condition of Collectible Military Swords
 How to Preserve and Store Your Military Uniforms

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